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Export Prospects of Korean Books

KPIPA’s Choice for Supporting Abstract · Sample Translation

 

2020.05.04

 

The Ghost Puppy's Adventures

A Sad Goodbye (New Edition)

1. Publication Details

Imprint | GAEAMNAMU
Title | The Ghost Puppy's Adventures
Author | Park Jeongan
Illustrator | Lee Minhae
Genre | Children's story
Format | 175×235
Binding | Paperback
Pages | 104pages
ISBN | 9788968305412

 

2. Contact

Name | Jo Wonson
Email | jws@gaeamnamu.co.kr
URL | http://blog.naver.com/gaeamnamu

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Family love; ghost; companion animal; sacrificial ceremony
Target Readership | Children aged 9 to 12

 

4. About the Author and Illustrator

Author - Park Jeongan
Park Jeongan started writing children's stories while studying children's literature in graduate school, and made her literary debut by wining the Noonnoppi Children's Literature Award. Park aims to write stories that are both interesting and touching. She has published Report Rude Norang, and has the forthcoming titles, Gold Is Gold! Legend of Baon Castle (working title), and Secret Place (working title).

Illustrator - Lee Minhae
Lee Minhae studied visual design at Hongik University and currently works as an illustrator. She has authored I Don't Want to Eat, Because I Am a Mother, and has illustrated Is There Anything That Can Be Done without Working? The Anger Is Boom! Boom! Boom!, Easy Politics That My Younger Sibling Can Understand, and Zipper Is Out of Order!.

 

5. About the Book

The Ghost Puppy's Adventures is a story about all the hustle and bustle that ensues when Chorong the ghost puppy comes back to life a year after his death to reunite with his human family. Chorong, who had lived with Yongjae for several years, remembers Yongjae having told him not to forget him after he dies and to come home on the anniversary of his death. The day Chorong arrives back in this world to meet his family also happens to be the ritual day of Yongjae's grandfather. Yongjae's grandfather does not welcome Chorong because he thinks a dog cannot be recognized as a family member. However, after he expels evil spirits with the help of Chorong, Yongjae's grandfather eventually accepts Chorong as part of the family. In this book, our present world and the afterlife, along with unforgettable characters including an angel of death and evel spirits, will intrigue readers. Like Coco, the well-known animated film, this story will impress readers with its theme of love through the passing of family members.

 

 

Not Another Brother!

The Light’s Past

1. Publication Details

Imprint | GAEAMNAMU
Title | Not Another Brother!
Author | Yeom Yeonhwa
Illustrator | Jeong Soyeong
Genre | Children's story
Format | 175×235
Binding | Paperback
Pages | 128pages
ISBN | 9788968305238

 

2. Contact

Name | Jo Wonson
Email | jws@gaeamnamu.co.kr
URL | http://blog.naver.com/gaeamnamu

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Family love; adoption; growth; family with many children
Target Readership | Children aged 9 to 12

 

4. About the Author and Illustrator

Author - Yeom Yeonhwa
Yeom Yeonhwa made her literary debut in 2013 in the annual spring literary contest sponsored by the daily Jeonbuk Ilbo. She's found happiness through writing children's stories, and dreams of writing a story that can be cherished by children even after they've grown up. Her works include Heart-Pounding Mailbox and Cow Dung Ball Is Rolling.

Illustrator - Jeong Soyeong
Jeong Soyeong majored in Western painting at Duksung Women's University and the graduate school of the same university, and studied illustration at HILLS. She has authored Ring, Ring, Here's Your Letter, I'm the Town Doctor, Cock-a-doodle-doo, Open a New Day, and has illustrated I Am Just Who I Am, I Don't Do Well in School, and Let's Play in the Mountain, Let's Play in the Forest. She lives with her Indian husband who is a good cook of curry in Paju.

 

5. About the Book

Not Another Brother! is the story of a boy who is desperate to do anything to avoid getting another sibling-who would be his third younger brother and the fifth boy in his family. Taeyun feels unhappy and stressed because he cannot play as much as he want to look after his younger siblings. Tired of cleaning up after his younger brothers, he starts sabotaging his parent's love. Taeyun sets a table for Samshin, the goddess of childbirth, and meets her in his dreams and pleads with her not to give his partents a new baby. After awhile, his mom has a miscarriage, and Taeyun regrets his behavior, and along with other family members, tries to console his mom. Observing Taeyun's growth reminds readers of the love for family. Moreover, as there are many only children nowadays, this book helps readers indirectly experience conflicts among siblings and problems that families must face together. The author hopes that the tireless daily lives of Taeyun's family will give readers a chance to reflect on the meaning of family and reaffirm their family's love.

 

 

Photoshop Goddess

Aagh! It’s a Monster!

1. Publication Details

Imprint | Gaeamnamu
Title | Photoshop Goddess
Author | Je Sungeun
Illustrator | Guk Minji
Genre| Children's story
Format| 175×235
Binding | Paperback
Pages| 124pages
ISBN | 9788968305337

 

2. Contact

Name | Jo Wonson
Email | jws@gaeamnamu.co.kr
URL | http://blog.naver.com/gaeamnamu

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Lookism; k-pop; F class; growth
Target Readership | Children aged 9 to 12

 

4. About the Author and Illustrator

Author - Je Sungeun
Je Sungeun made her literary debut by winning the Saebeot Literary Award and won a script contest at the Chuncheon Puppet Festival. She aims to write stories that help children discover the joy of reading. Je has published Photoshop Goddess, Dancing Handkerchief, Tumult over Money, Nitpicking Center, Wide Talk Room Ghost, Sea Witch Ursula's Counseling Center, Gi Un Chan the Nostril Hair Man's Fine Dust Warning, and Doh Hani the Youtube Creator's Studio 999.

Illustrator - Guk Minji
Guk Minji was born in Jeonju, Jeonbuk Province in 1992. She enjoys working as an illustrator and has illustrated 4 Cards, The Earth Boy, My Teacher Is AI, Water Is Really Strong, Sunshine Village Apartment Zoo, My Neighbor Tonggu, and But Still Happy.

 

5. About the Book

Jian, the protagonist of Photoshop Goddess, wants to be an idol star. She dreams of becoming a singer who is internationally famous like a K-Pop celebrity. However, her "ugly" look is an obstacle against realizing her dream. Not only her male classmates, but her own mother hurts her feelings by criticizing her appearance. Jian herself has always felt daunted by her looks. As a present, one day Jian's friend Hyerim, who happens to be good at Photoshop, gives Jian a picture where Jian has been beautifully transformed through Photoshop. Thanks to this photo, Jian gets the chance to participate in an audition. However, the rouse is up and she doesn't pass the audition. Despite the result, Jian doesn't give up, and with the support and solidarity of Hyerim, learns to grow up. In this story, you can see a regular girl challenge the world and break through to realize her dreams. Young readers will find the courage and hope they need to make their dreams come true.

 

 

The No-Lose Toy Egg Vending Machine

Go Stoppy-go

1. Publication Details

Imprint | BIR Publishing Co., Ltd.
Title | The No-Lose Toy Egg Vending Machine
Author | Gwak Yujin
Illustrator | Cha Sangmi
Genre | Children's book
Format | 148×215
Binding | Hard cover
Pages | 72pages
ISBN | 9798949162027

 

2. Contact

Name | Claire Yang
Phone | +82-2-515-2000
Email | claire@bir.co.kr

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Fantasy; Restoring a Relationship
Target Readership | Ages 9 - 12

 

4. About the Author and Illustrator

Author - Gwak Yujin
Born in Tongyeong, author Gwak Yujin grew up with the beautiful sea and magnificent shipyards of the area. Her literary career began when she received an award at the 4th SF Award in 2017 with her novella Mother’s Children. The No-Lose Toy Egg Vending Machine won the grand prize at the 9th BIR Literary Awards in 2019. She’s currently a member of the Science Fiction Writers Union of the Republic of Korea.

Illustrator - Cha Sangmi
Illustrator Cha Shangmi has been drawing for a variety of media after majoring in visual design. Her works include: The No-Lose Toy Egg Vending Machine, How to Fly, The Spring Bear, What If It Comes Off?, and Is It Just Me?

 

5. About the Book

The warmth, comfort, and magical fantasy that a toy egg vending machine offers
“I… I shouldn’t try the vending machine.”
“Haha, don’t be scared. There’s nothing wrong. Go on and try.”
Heesu is a girl who always bought toys from a vending machine for fun on her way to and from school, but for some reason, she stops the routine all of a sudden. The book carefully depicts how Heesu starts using the toy egg vending machine again, gradually thawing her frozen heart and re-finding her voice.
The truth is, Heesu has been suffering from aphasia after undergoing the traumatic experience of losing her parents. The book doesn’t reveal the whole truth from the start but, instead, presents a magical story of a girl discovering a toy vending machine that always gives a prize, and recovering from the scars in her heart as she draws toys from the machine.
The boy and the girl who take Heesu to the “special machine” remind her of her parents when they were young. The child-versions of the parents help Heesu complete the action of drawing a toy from a vending machine so that Heesu doesn’t have any sense of guilt left within her. And by doing this in a fantastic time and space, Heesu overcomes her sadness.
At first, readers will follow the emotions of Heesu, the main character, but upon rereading the book, they will view Heesu with the eyes of the boy and the girl, wishing Heesu all the happiness in the world. The author describes parents’ genuine hope for their children to live a healthy life in this sweet, heartwarming story full of magic.
Buying small toys from a capsule toy vending machine used to be Heesu’s favorite activity, but suddenly, she begins to hate it. One day, she visits a stationery store in front of the school and enters an alleyway behind it. On her way, she meets a boy who takes her to a “toy vending machine that always gives a prize.” Heesu hesitates, but the boy keeps persuading her to try, saying that it never fails to give a prize and that, after all, it’s just a vending machine. She puts in her 500 won coin and actually gets a capsule that says “1st place” written on it. The prize is two old toothbrushes. What will she do with them?

 

 

Garlic in History

The Children of God

1. Publication Details

Imprint | KwangMoonKag Publishing Co.
Title | Garlic in History
Author| PARK Hong-hyun; LEE Seong-dong
Genre | History
Format | 152×225
Binding | Paperback
Pages | 272pages
ISBN | 9788997383924

 

2. Contact

Name | JUNG Hakyung
Phone | +82-31-955-8775
Email | kwangmk7@hanmail.net
URL | kwangmoonkag.co.kr

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Health; longevity; food
Target Readership | Adults

 

4. About the Author

PARK Hong-hyun (Doctor of natural sciences, Dankook University)
Professor of food service management, College of Hotel and Tourism Management, Kyung Hee University
Honorary Professor, Kyung Hee University
511phh@hanmail.net

LEE Seong-dong (Doctor of engineering, Dongguk University)
Professor of food and nutrition, College of Health Science, Korea University
Honorary Professor, Korea University
lsdojm@hanmail.net

 

5. About the Book

Garlic has a unique history of being both revered and reviled. On the one hand, it is an ancient ingredient that prevented disease, cured illness, and increased vitality. People ate garlic on a daily basis at the pyramid construction sites in ancient Egypt, and the troops of Alexander the Great were provided with garlic to maintain their tireless energy. However, other civilizations despised garlic due to its strong odor. In Buddhist culture, it was absolutely prohibited. Confucian culture dismissed it as an unclean food. Yet, despite the fact that many people detested its smell, there must have been real benefits for garlic to be loved by others.
According to an article by The Guardian which lists 30 ways to live long and healthy, 9 items concerned food, and garlic was one of the first items, along with unrefined grain, vegetables, fruit, fish, wine, coffee, and tea. Consuming one or two cloves of garlic can reduce harmful chemicals in the body by 48 percent, and prevent cancer, problems with the immune system, and arthritis. Garlic is also said to help with memory and Alzheimer’s disease.
Most historical references to garlic come from royal courts or aristocrats, which makes it difficult to understand the underlying culture among regular people. The authority to work with letters is closely tied with power, so the lives of the people are conveyed via items and stories. We often call this folk culture.
Folk culture is not always transmitted accurately, nor is its meaning clear. However, folk culture captures the lives of the people. This is why stories of people living in the same environment and region resonate with the others. This book compiles various records and was written as a collection of the stories, rather than a story itself.

 

 

Treasure of Korea

YOU DON'T HAVE TO GET ALONG WITH EVERYBODY

1. Publication Details

Imprint | KwangMoonKag Publishing co.
Title | Treasure of Korea
Subtitle | Open to the World
Author | Emanuel Pastreich (Lee Man-yeol); Gosan (Go Yeong-ju)
Genre | Humanities
Format | 152×225
Binding | Paperback
Pages | 272pages
ISBN | 9791188768202

 

2. Contact

Name | JUNG Hakyung
Phone | +82-31-955-8775
Email | kwangmk7@hanmail.net
URL | kwangmoonkag.co.kr

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Korea; hallyu, Korean Wave; Treasure
Target Readership | Adults

 

4. About the Author

Emanuel Pastreich (Lee Man-yeol)
With a BA in Chinese Studies from Yale College, an MA in Comparative Literature from the University of Tokyo, and a PhD. in East Asian Studies from Harvard University, Professor Pastreich has worked in different places: in the Department of East Asian Language and Culture at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; as Adjunct Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies at George Washington University; in the SolBridge International School of Business at Woosong University; as an advisor to the Korean Embassy in the United States and an editor-in-chief of a volume published by the Korean Foreign Ministry; as Associate Professor at the Humanitas College of Kyung Hee University and as director of Asia Institute at the same university.
Pastreich is now professor at the University of Washington.
He has published several books: A Korea Greater than Koreans Imagined Possible; Scholars of the World Speak Out About Korea’s Future; Life is a Matter of Direction, Not of Speed: Records of a Robinson Crusoe in Korea; Museums Ask Questions, among others.

Gosan (Go Yeong-ju)
Gosan has studied and majored in various areas: Business Administration, Industrial Design, and Korean History at the College of Business Administration, College of Arts, and College of Humanities at Seoul National University. He also studied at the Graduate School of Environment and of Architecture at the same university.
He has taught at Korea University, Kyung Hee University, and KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and has written various books in the areas of humanities, science, and the arts. He has also developed programs that help talented young people to think creatively. Three books written by him were selected as Excellent Books of Science by Ministry of Education, Science and Technology in 2009.
He now writes and translates various books in the humanities and the arts for the empowerment of young students. His recent books are Science Blog (excellent book of science), Science Textbook series, Journey of Science into the World History, and Museums Ask Questions, among others.
He has translated Age of Myths (5 volumes), Seven Colors of Love, Zeitgeist 2, and has planned Travelogue of the Universe, along with various books of general education and bestseller educational comics for children.

 

5. About the Book

The culture of mingling is prevalent in the city plan of Seoul. The Palace of Versailles clearly shows the difference between a city planned around the king as the center and a city of togetherness with people. The king’s power in France strongly influenced the environment of the city. The French city of the king had to shine with dignity. Seoul, however, does not display the Korean king’s absolute power through external pomp. Whenever I show photos of Seoul around 1900, most students feel embarrassed. Seoul looks too insignificant compared to the Paris of the time, with its townhouses lining the broad boulevards. I cannot agree with my students’ response. In the 1860s, Paris went through a massive urban renewal.
Georges-Eugène Haussmann, who carried out this renewal program, had hardly any sense of community life. What he produced was a city plan for the king and the palace as its center. Such changes in and around Paris brought only inconvenience to the people.
The city plan of Seoul was made with the people completely in mind. The humble palaces in Seoul particularly represent the highest value of Korea’s Confucian tradition very well. The royal palaces and the conduct of high-ranking servants in the early Joseon Dynasty were more transparent than any other societies in Europe and China. They had a strong consciousness of their responsibility for the people. Furthermore, their attitudes toward people were very humane.
It is not an easy task to enhance, culturally and politically, Korea’s future position in the world. We cannot, however, remain at the status quo. Things like “number of Korean smartphones sold overseas” or “the Korean popstars popular overseas” are not of real significance. More crucial in determining Korea’s influence are values such as transparency and responsibility discovered in Korean tradition. Suggesting such values as a universal model will enhance Korea’s position in the world. To do so, we must find what treasures we have in ourselves. We must mull over how to revive things that have long been ignored. Korea’s treasures can become treasures for the world.

 

 

King Gojong on Modern Knowledge

Go Stoppy-go

1. Publication Details

Imprint | SANZINI
Title | King Gojong on Modern Knowledge
Subtitle | 12 Chinese Publications Newly Revealed from the King's Royal Library
Author | Yoon Jiyang
Genre | Humanities
Format | 152×223
Binding | Paperback
Pages | 333pages
ISBN | 9788965456407

 

2. Contact

Name | Kang Sugeul
Phone | +82-051-504-7070
Email | sanzini@sanzinibook.com
URL | https://sanzinibook.tistory.com/

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Gojong; book; Joseon Dynasty; China
Target Readership | Adult

 

4. About the Author

After studying Chinese literature at Seoul National University, the author received a doctorate at Seoul National University for his research into the reception of the Chinese epic play The Western Chamber in Korea. For four years, he participated in the work to interpret ancient Chinese texts kept in the Kyujanggak archives, and is currently involved in researching the East Asian reception of ancient Chinese content from ancient times to the present. His research topics include the contemporary interpretation of classics and their use in educational settings. As of 2020, he is currently working as a senior research fellow at the SNU Institute of Humanities while also teaching at SNU and the University of Seoul.

 

5. About the Book

Known as the royal who reigned during the kingdom’s tragic demise, King Gojong of Korea was subjected to negative criticism until the 1990s. When the Korean Empire, which the King himself built, lost its sovereignty to Japan and was preyed upon by major powers, Gojong became branded as an incompetent leader who was unfit to respond to a national crisis. Recently, however, scholars have begun seeing Gojong in a new light, as a leader who was instrumental in bringing Western science and technology to Korea and who leveraged this knowledge to transform Korea into a more autonomous modern nation.
This book has made a new attempt at identifying the 12 Chinese books that have laid the groundwork for Gojong’s thoughts on Enlightenment reform. Much research has been undertaken into the King’s new ideology and the resulting reformist projects, but not much has been done to identify the source of this knowledge and thinking, namely, into the King’s reading habits. Gojong’s royal study, the Jipokjae, stored over 1,900 Chinese publications. Although there have been efforts to take stock of the library’s general inventory, there were few attempts made to explore the individual volumes in detail. This book describes 12 influential Chinese books that were kept in the library and tries to understand why Gojong ordered the purchase of these books and what he read in their pages. By doing so, the book provides a specific clue to further research into Gojong’s commitment to Enlightenment reform. By looking into Gojong’s vast library collection, readers can better understand his worldview and his dreams for a reformed Korea.
Gojong ordered that a private library, the Jipokjae, be built within Gyeongbokgung Palace. He was voracious in buying new books; of all the Joseon kings, Gojong made the most purchases of Chinese books. After the 1875 incident involving the Japanese gunboat Unyo, Gojong decided upon the Theory of Eastern Way and Western Means which inspired him to issue various reformist policies. In an effort to embrace these Western “means,” or Western technology, Gojong began making purchases of various Chinese books, which later served as the foundation for the Gwangmu reforms he proposed after the founding of the Korean Empire.
This book presents a new direction for future bibliography studies as well as research into the formation of Korea’s modern knowledge. Thus far, not much attention has been given to the Chinese publications that were introduced to Korea since the late 19th to early 20th centuries. Scholars of Chinese literature were more interested in interpreting the text rather than identifying the primary archives, whereas in bibliography studies, scholars paid more focus on woodblock prints and older Korean books rather than the Chinese books that were printed after the 19th century. And yet, the exchange of Chinese books that occurred during the world’s transition into the modern era, at a time when international politics surrounding East Asia were developing rapidly and knowledge was being exchanged at an unprecedented pace, played an important role in establishing an East Asia knowledge network. Therefore, analyzing the Chinese books that were brought to Korea during that time will allow us to better understand how knowledge was exchanged across East Asia during the transition into modern times, as well as identify the sources behind Korea’s modern knowledge. Following a careful study of the Chinese books that King Gojong purchased, this book identifies the same books as having been an important channel that introduced modern knowledge to Korea.

 

 

I Work at the Kaesong Industrial Complex

Go Stoppy-go

1. Publication Details

Imprint | SANZINI
Title | Work at the Kaesong Industrial Complex
Subtitle | A Story of the Year I Spent at Kaesong
Author | Kim Minju
Genre | Literature
Format | 130×190
Binding | Paperback
Pages | 222pages
ISBN | 9788965456353

 

2. Contact

Name | Kang Sugeul
Phone | +82-051-504-7070
Email | sanzini@sanzinibook.com
URL | https://sanzinibook.tistory.com/

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Kaesong Industrial Complex; division; Korean Peninsula; unification; North Korea
Target Readership | Adult

 

4. About the Author

Based on her experience working for the Department of Social and Cultural Affairs of the Ministry of Unification and the United Nations World Food Programme, Kang Sugeul wrote her thesis on the malnutrition of North Koreans who grew up during the North Korean famine or the Arduous March. After seeing a job posting for a nutritionist at the Kaesong Industrial Complex, she crossed the Armistice Line and headed for North Korea the same month she earned her master’s degree.
She spent a year there as “Manager Madam,” responsible for bringing in food supplies for the approximately 3,000 workers there, including those at the Nurimi factory building, and managing the North Korean staff. Even after the sudden closure of the Complex, she worked at the North Korean Refugees Foundation, responsible for supporting their settlement in the South, and met North Korean defectors from all walks of life and broadened her perspective on North Korea.

 

5. About the Book

Have you ever imagined crossing the armistice line to commute to North Korea? Will a day come when South Korean students set to graduate from college will prepare for employment in the North? Having North Koreans for work colleagues, something only imaginable in novels, was possible at the Kaesong Industrial Complex which was part of the inter-Korean economic cooperation project. I Work at the Kaesong Industrial Complex contains stories of North Korea and its people whom the author met while working as a nutritionist at the Kaesong Industrial Complex for a year before it closed in 2016.
The author remembers seeing children ravaging for food amongst building ruins in Pakistan. She was reminded of the Korean War and the division of her own homeland and began to take serious interest in reunification with North Korea. Upon returning to South Korea she decided to work for North Korean children suffering from starvation and began to study to become a nutrition expert.In the spring of 2015, the author rides a bus to the Kaesong Industrial Complex while repeatedly reciting a list of things she has to be careful of while in the North. She spends a year there as “Manager Madam,” responsible for bringing in food supplies for the approximately 3,000 workers there, including those at the Nurimi factory building, and managing the North Korean staff.
The author is twenty-eight-years-old but she tells the North Korean staff she is forty-one so that they don’t take her lightly. She becomes friendly with the North Koreans by sharing South Korean instant coffee pouches with them, applies medicine to a North Korean employee’s injured finger behind the group leader’s back, and exchanges South Korean-style fillings for making kimchi for North Korean ones.
At times they feel hurt from misunderstandings that arise because their manners of expression are different and sometimes there is a war of nerves over even trivial matters because of the competition between the different systems of the two Koreas, but they cannot hide their sadness over the sudden parting without a promise to meet again.
The news of North Korea we encounter is refined and adjusted through mass media. There is more to North Korea than just Kim Jong-un or nuclear weapons. There too people think of their family first when there is delicious food, there too there is conflict between mother-in-laws and daughter-in-laws, there too there are ordinary people making kimchi in the winter. The book contains stories of custom officers, soldiers, laborers, duty-free saleswomen, security guards, and North Korean employees who laughed and cried and worked together every day. In other words, ordinary and little stories about neighbors. The tensions created whenever there were delicate maneuverings between the two Koreas between 2015 and 2016, the friendships that bloomed every day, the compassion for one another is all part of this book. Readers can feel the cautious yet sincere feelings of the North Korean people beyond the propagandist slogans, feelings we never hear about in the mass media that only talks about socio-political relations.

 

 

Library in the Tree

Go Stoppy-go

1. Publication Details

Imprint | Woorinabi Publishing Co.
Title | Library in the Tree
Author | Lee Su-bok
Illustrator | Lee Jun-bok
Genre | Children's book
Format | 250×185
Binding | Hardcover
Pages | 56pages
ISBN | 9791186843505

 

2. Contact

Name | Rosa Han
Phone | +82-70-7768-382
Email | joerosa@naver.com
URL | https://www.facebook.com/Woorinabi

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Library; reading; adventure; nature; storytelling
Target Readership | Age 9 and up

 

4. About the Author and Illustrator

Author - Lee Su-bok
Lee Su-bok studied neuroscience, philosophy, data science, and politics and economics. He writes stories during his commute on the crowded subway. He likes to tell stories that are fun-filled and inspirational, like all the expressions one can see on children’s faces.

Illustrator - Lee Jun-bok
Lee Jun-bok is the president of Cold Brush Inc., which produces webtoons and games. He also works as an illustrator. He studied animation, neuroscience, and data science, and enjoys watching YouTube videos. He likes to draw illustrations that are heartwarming and sunny like the spring sunlight coming through a window.

 

5. About the Book

A boy leaves the city where people don’t read books anymore, and he heads to the forest. Unlike the dreary city, the forest is quiet and refreshingly green, the best place for reading. When the boy starts reading, a monkey in a tree becomes curious and wants to know what the boy is doing. The monkey learns that the boy’s bag isn’t filled with cookies or fruit but with books. The boy and the monkey go on a fun adventure by reading the boy’s books, and the monkey realizes the world is bigger than he had thought and that there are exciting things happening everywhere. Soon, other animals join the boy and the monkey’s book adventure. It becomes crowded with many animals joining them. Realizing how fun reading is, the animals decide to bring books from the city to the forest. This is not hard to do because the people in the city no longer care for books, preferring other ways to get information. The boy continues to read for the forest animals to their delight. One day, it suddenly starts to rain, and the books are in danger of getting all wet. Fortunately, the animals move all the books to the bear’s cave, which becomes packed with books, leaving no place for the bear. The boy says, “It’d be so nice if there was a library in the forest.” Hearing that, the forest animals decide to build a library. After the boy returns to the city, the animals decide to build a library on top of the zelkova tree in the forest and fill the library with the books. The library is built with only the materials from the forest, but it looks amazing. However, the boy no longer visits the forest. Unable to see the boy anymore, the forest animals decide to embark on an adventure by themselves. With the adventures they have had by reading books, they feel ready to go out in the world and have some fun. They then come back and write a book about their adventures. Years pass, and the boy heads to the forest again. He had been sick in the hospital, which was why he couldn’t visit the forest. Once he arrives at the forest, he sees a small house filled with books, the library in the tree with the books about the adventures that the forest animals had had. Library in the Tree tells the adventures that a boy and his animal friends have by reading books and how they embark on their own journey after being inspired by reading. By contrasting the city people, who spend all their time watching videos, with the forest animals, who enjoy reading, the book prompts readers to think about their own reading habits. It is also fun to read about the forest animals building a library without cement or bricks but only with what they can find in the forest. The book teaches young readers to have the courage to go out into the world and embark on a journey and also about having faith in oneself despite failures. The book will move the hearts of young readers and also inspire them to take action towards their goal.

 

 

Stamp-Stamp

Go Stoppy-go

1. Publication Details

Imprint | Woorinabi Publishing Co.
Title | Stamp-Stamp
Author | Phil Jay Smith
Genre | Children's book
Format | 250×185
Binding | Hardcover
Pages | 44pages
ISBN | 9791186843512

 

2. Contact

Name | Rosa Han
Phone | +82-70-7768-382
Email | joerosa@naver.com
URL | https://www.facebook.com/Woorinabi

 

3. Marketing Information

Keyword | Identity; friendship, relationship, growing up; confidence; adventure; cooperation
Target Readership | Age 6 and up

 

4. About the Author

Phil Jay Smith is a comic book editor who loves illustration books. He had written short and sweet stories to tell his ill friend so that he could forget about his illness, and now one of those stories is this illustration book. Stamp-Stamp, Smith’s first book, will make readers wait impatiently for his next story, for it is certain that it will be even more fun and heartwarming.

 

5. About the Book

He is a leopard cub. He has soft fur but no leopard spots. One day he sees a kitten up in a tree, too scared to come down. The leopard cub helps the kitten come down, and the kitten stamps his paws on him. Stamp-stamp. The leopard cub sees a lion crying over his messed-up mane. The leopard cub combs it so that it’s nice and pretty. The lion hugs the cub and stamps his paws on him. Stamp-stamp. The leopard cub sees a mole who is lost and confused. The cub helps him find his way home. The mole puts his stamp on him. Stamp-stamp. The cub sees an elephant crying because of his tied-up trunk. The leopard cub unties the elephant’s trunk. The elephant stamps him with his trunk. Stamp-stamp. The adorable cub comes back home. He realizes he now has handsome spots. A leopard cub was born without any spots. But there is nothing to worry about. Every day he earns spots on his coat. Every time he helps other animals in need, he gets spots, the spots the other animals stamp on his coat to express their gratitude.
A selection at the Hidden Writers Contest sponsored by the Gyeonggi Content Agency, Stamp-Stamp is Phil Jay Smith’s first book. Leopard cubs are all born with spots, except the cub in the story. He earns them. His spots are created by him and the other animals he meets. The story illustrates how everyone is shaped and changed by the people around them and the people they interact with, and through the interactions, they get their own spots stamped on their lives.

 

 


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